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Spondylitis Association of America Research Article Archive

Health research has high value to society. It can provide important information about disease trends and risk factors, outcomes of treatment, functional abilities, patterns of care, and health care costs and use. The different approaches to research provide complementary insights. Clinical trials can provide important information about the efficacy and adverse effects of medical interventions by controlling the variables that could impact the results of the study, but feedback from real-world clinical experience is also crucial for comparing and improving the use of drugs, vaccines, medical devices, and diagnostics.

Below you will find links to some of the studies that have contributed to our increased understanding of spondyloarthritis.

SAA receives no government funding and relies on the generous donations from individuals to create and maintain the programs and services aimed at improving the futures of the 2.7 million Americans affected by spondylitis.

Research Article Archive

New advances in juvenile spondyloarthritis

Shirley M. L. Tse and Ronald M. Laxer

Abstract

Juvenile spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a distinct disease to adult SpA, and usually manifests as peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. Importantly, many patients with juvenile SpA continue to be at risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis during their disease course. In this Review, the classification and diagnostic criteria, clinical manifestations and treatment guidelines for juvenile SpA will be discussed. Advances in the diagnosis of and management strategies for juvenile SpA will lead to earlier recognition, appropriate treatmen

Physical Therapy and Surgery

Rafael Valle-Onate, MD, Michael M. Ward, MD and Gail S. Kerr, MD

Abstract

Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective than individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest that combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons.

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